New Excess Soil Regulation Proposal

The Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change is conducting consultations on a proposed new regulation for reusing excess soil. The proposal is designed to enhance opportunities for the beneficial reuse of excess soil, while protecting human health and the environment from inappropriately moved soil. Feedback collected by the ministry will help to inform a new proposed regulation under the Environmental Protection Act. 

Find out more about this proposal here.

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New Report on Climate Change and Municipal Risk

As extreme weather becomes more prevalent across Canada, water-related damage has become the primary source of property insurance claims. However, municipalities have not developed stronger capacity to anticipate and mitigate potential flood damage. A new paper from the Institute of Municipal Finance and Governance (IMFG) examines the tools that are available to cities to reduce their exposure to the risks of flood damage. According to the paper:

Climate change poses significant risks for Canadian municipalities, particularly in the form of extreme weather, such as severe thunderstorms, ice storms, hailstorms, windstorms, blizzards, and tornadoes. Canada’s major cities are especially vulnerable to extreme weather, due to their large, dense populations, valuable and geographically concentrated property, and complex, interdependent infrastructure networks, all of which are susceptible to threats from localized climate hazards.

Read the full paper here.

Government Releases Strategy for a Waste-Free Ontario

The Ministry of Environment and Climate Change released a paper last week that outlines its strategy to divert more waste from landfills. The province’s Strategy for a Waste-Free Ontario: Building the Circular Economy outlines the provinces proposed actions to fight climate change by reducing the amount of waste the ends up in landfills instead of being reused, recycled, composted, or reintegrated into the economy.

You can find the full strategy here.

Strategies for Cities to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emmissions

A new paper from the Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance (IMFG) reviews the strategies of three cities that are leading the charge to fight climate change. According to the paper the three common and effective strategies in these municipalities are:

  • Building and maintaining a broad-based coalition of governmental and non-governmental actors working toward a common goal;
  • Investing in capacity-building, data collection, and education; and
  • Embedding new ideas, financial tools, and standards into local formal and informal decision-making institutions.

You can read the full paper here.

Province Developing Municipal Carbon Emissions Targets

The province is developing a plan for helping municipalities measure, cap and cut their carbon emissions. According to the Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change, the province’s framework for municipalities will be developed over the next two years, and will include actions to help municipalities improve local land-use policies, strengthen local energy planning, and reduce traffic congestion and emissions from all forms of transportation.

Event: Climate Risk Management Strategies for Municipalities

The Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance is hosting an event on how municipalities can better prepare themselves for extreme weather as the global climate shifts. See below for a full description of the event, which will be held in Toronto on February 28, 2017. Register here.

Tackling the Storm out of the Norm: Climate Risk Management Strategies for Canadian Cities

Description

Severe thunderstorms, flooding, hail and icestorms, and blizzards increasingly threaten Canadian cities. As the global climate shifts, Canadian cities face significant and costly risks from extreme weather. These costs are enhanced in cities because they have large, dense populations, valuable and geographically concentrated property, and complex infrastructure networks. What tools are available to local governments seeking to share the growing risks associated with a changing climate with other levels of government and non-governmental actors?

This talk is the first in a series of IMFG publications and events on climate change and Canadian cities.

About the Speakers

Daniel Henstra is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Waterloo. His research centres on public administration and public policy, with a focus on emergency management, climate adaptation, and flood risk governance. Within these subject areas, he investigates multilevel policy processes involving federal, provincial, and municipal governments, and the complex, networked relationships among elected officials, public servants, stakeholders, and the public.

Jason Thistlethwaite is Assistant Professor in the School of Environment, Enterprise and Development (SEED) at the University of Waterloo. His research focuses on the financial risks of climate change, natural disasters, and extreme weather. His recent work explores the role of insurance and government risk management in promoting climate change adaptation and reducing economic vulnerability at the local level.

First Ministers Reach Climate Deal

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and most of Canada’s provincial premiers signed a pan-Canadian climate deal last week. The deal includes targets to help Canada meet its 2030 emissions reduction targets. With the exception of Saskatchewan and Manitoba, all other provinces signed on to the deal which is designed to help Canada fulfill it’s commitments under the Paris Accord.

For more:

Government Reviewing Mining Act and Aggregate Resources Act

The government has introduced legislation that would amend the Mining Act and the Aggregate Resources Act. The legislation is designed to introduce stronger oversight, enhanced environmental accountability, better information and participation, and increased fees and royalties for the government. You can find a summary of this proposed legislation here. The government is accepting comments on this legislation until December 5, 2016.

For more:

Bill 39, Aggregate Resources and Mining Modernization Act, 2016

 

Province and Federal Government Announce Clean Water and Wastewater Funding Agreement

Today the federal and provincial governments announced a bilateral agreement that will make more than $1.1 billion of combined funding (federal government will provide $570 million, provincial government will fund $270 million, and municipalities and first nations will make up the rest) available to municipalities and First Nations communities under the Clean Water and Wastewater Fund (CWWF). As part of the announcement the government also revealed an initial list of 41 projects that have been approved for funding under the program:

Location Project Name Federal Funding Provincial Funding Anticipated Start Date

City of Barrie

Hotchkiss Creek Expansion- Essa, Anne to Gowan

$2,200,000

$1,100,000

January 1, 2017

City of Barrie

Memorial Square Redevelopment – flood prevention

$175,000

$87,500

January 2, 2017

City of Barrie

Sanitary Servicing – Royal Oak, Bay, Cottage (Federal Funding Name: Sanitary Servicing to Reduce Phosphorus to Lake Simcoe- Royal Oak, Bay, Cottage)

$5,950,000

$2,975,000

January 1, 2017

City of Barrie

Stormwater Management Pond Retrofit – Hotchkiss Creek at Bryne Drive

$226,500

$113,250

January 1, 2017

City of Barrie

Water, Wastewater and Stormwater Master Plans and Needs Studies

$900,000

$450,000

September 30, 2016

City of Brampton

Environmental Assessment Strategic Plan and Sustainability Framework for the Downtown Etobicoke Creek Revitalization Project

$175,000

$87,500

January 30, 2017

City of Brampton

Etobicoke Creek Valley Landfill Assessment

$150,000

$75,000

January 30, 2017

City of Brampton

Storm Sewer Network Assessment

$625,000

$312,500

January 30, 2017

City of Brampton

Central Area Storm Sewer Modelling

$600,000

$300,000

January 30, 2017

City of Brampton

Upper 9 Stormwater Management Pond Retrofit

$325,000

$162,500

April 1, 2017

City of Brampton

Stormwater Management Pond Retrofits

$1,000,000

$500,000

April 1, 2017

City of Brampton

Stormwater Management Pond Sediment Removal

$800,000

$400,000

January 30, 2017

City of Brampton

Modulation of Thermal Effects in Stormwater Management Pond Discharge

$196,192

$98,096

January 30, 2017

City of Brampton

Integrated Stormwater Management for Erosion Control

$1,000,000

$500,000

January 30, 2017

City of Brampton

Fletcher’s Creek Roadway Stormwater Conveyance Control

$500,000

$250,000

January 30, 2017

City of Greater Sudbury

1st Avenue – upgrade to main water line in Coniston

$1,935,000

$967,500

November 1, 2016

City of Greater Sudbury

Spruce Street – upgrade of water main water line

$2,128,500

$1,064,250

November 1, 2016

City of Greater Sudbury

York Street – Regent Street to Paris Street – Water Main Lining

$250,000

$125,000

May 1, 2017

City of Greater Sudbury

Strathmere Court – Robinson Drive East to Robinson Drive West – Water Main Lining

$125,000

$62,500

May 1, 2017

City of Greater Sudbury

Mikkola Road – Culvert Replacement at Kantola Road

$80,000

$40,000

May 1, 2017

City of Greater Sudbury

Westmount Avenue – Culvert Replacement – Greenvale Court

$255,000

$127,500

May 1, 2017

City of Greater Sudbury

Yorkshire Drive – Culvert Replacement near Sewer Plant

$125,000

$62,500

May 1, 2017

City of Greater Sudbury

Manninen Road – Culvert Replacement

$90,000

$45,000

May 1, 2017

City of Greater Sudbury

Edward Avenue – Culvert Replacement

$90,000

$45,000

May 1, 2017

City of Greater Sudbury

Seguin Street – Culvert Replacement

$120,000

$60,000

May 1, 2017

City of Greater Sudbury

Nickel Basin Road – McKenzie Creek Culvert Replacement

$250,000

$125,000

May 1, 2017

City of Greater Sudbury

MR55 – Culvert Replacement

$315,000

$157,500

May 1, 2017

City of Greater Sudbury

Tilton Lake Road – Culvert Replacement

$165,000

$82,500

May 1, 2017

City of Greater Sudbury

Strathmere Court – Robinson Drive East to Robinson Drive West – Sewer Main Lining

$50,000

$25,000

May 1, 2017

City of Greater Sudbury

York Street – Regent Street to Paris Street – Sewer Main Lining

$55,000

$27,500

May 1, 2017

City of Greater Sudbury

Stormwater Asset Management Plan

$200,000

$100,000

January 15, 2017

City of Greater Sudbury

David Street – Storm Water Outlet Treatment Station – Design & Construction

$800,000

$400,000

October 15, 2016

City of Guelph

Metcalfe Street Reconstruction – Phase 1

$1,797,890

$898,945

October 1, 2016

City of Guelph

Snow Disposal Facility Upgrade

$2,500,000

$1,250,000

October 1, 2016

City of Guelph

Stormwater Management and Pond Maintenance

$750,000

$375,000

January 1, 2017

City of Toronto

Essroc Quay Lake Filling and Naturalization – Port Lands Flood Protection

$32,500,000

$16,250,000

October 1, 2016

Municipality of Wawa

Membrane Filters at Water Treatment Plant

$60,262

$30,131

January 1, 2017

Regional Municipality of Waterloo

Hespeler Wastewater Treatment Plant Upgrades

$2,000,000

$1,000,000

July 1, 2016

Regional Municipality of Waterloo

Preston Wastewater Treatment Plan Upgrades

$1,500,000

$750,000

June 1, 2016

Regional Municipality of Waterloo

Foxboro Wastewater Treatment Plant Upgrades

$1,500,000

$750,000

April 1, 2017

Regional Municipality of Waterloo

Mannheim Reservoirs Inlet Piping Upgrades

$2,115,979

$1,057,990

July 1, 2016

For more:

News Release: Canada and Ontario Reach Agreement Under the New Clean Water and Wastewater Fund

Province Reviewing Environmental Bill of Rights

The government of Ontario is reviewing the province’s Environmental Bill of Rights to ensure that it is achieving its objectives. The Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change has prepared a discussion guide that outlines relevant sections of the current Environmental Bill of Rights as well as a series of questions to help guide feedback from stakeholders and the public.

Comments can be submitted to the Ministry until November 8, 2016. You can find more information about this consultation here.

For more:

Discussion Guide–Review of Ontario’s Environmental Bill of Rights

Environmental Bill of Rights